Greensill lobbying scandal: David Cameron to stand lengthy afternoon of MPs’ questions

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Former high minister David Cameron is about to stand a protracted afternoon of questions from MPs over his lobbying for a now-collapsed finance company.

The ex-premier is because of seem on Thursday prior to two separate Area of Commons committees over his movements on behalf of Greensill Capital.

Mr Cameron has already been printed to have bombarded ministers and officers – in addition to the Financial institution of England – with WhatsApps, texts and emails in his pursuit of successful Greensill get right of entry to to government-backed COVID reinforce schemes.

However there are final questions over Mr Cameron’s dating with the company’s founder, Lex Greensill, the federal government’s use of provide chain finance schemes whilst he was once in Quantity 10, and the way Greensill Capital collapsed into insolvency previous this yr.

Mr Greensill’s trade actions and Mr Cameron’s lobbying of the federal government on his behalf are lately matter to a string of inquiries.

Two of the ones being performed via MPs will pay attention proof from the previous high minister on Thursday.

To begin with, from 2.30pm, Mr Cameron will give proof to the Commons’ Treasury committee. And he’s going to then seem in entrance of the Public Accounts Committee from 5pm.

Mr Cameron has thus far no longer commented on his lobbying on behalf of Greensill save for a 1,500-word commentary he put out to wreck weeks of silence.

In that commentary, Mr Cameron mentioned he was once “desperately sorry” for the ones suffering from the company’s cave in – which has threatened hundreds of jobs – and that he approved there have been “vital classes to be learnt”.

“As a former high minister, I settle for that communications with authorities want to be performed via handiest probably the most formal of channels, so there will also be no room for misinterpretation,” he added.

On the other hand, he insisted he lobbied ministers all through the COVID disaster no longer just for the advantage of Greensill – through which he had proportion choices – however that he “sincerely believed there can be a subject material receive advantages for UK companies at a difficult time”.

Texts from David Cameron to Tom Scholar, a treasury official
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Texts from Mr Cameron to Tom Pupil, a Treasury respectable

The previous high minister additionally denied that Mr Greensill, who was once introduced in as a central authority adviser when Mr Cameron was once in Downing Boulevard, was once a “shut member” of his workforce.

Mr Cameron mentioned he met Mr Greensill “two times at maximum” all through his six-year spell as high minister, even supposing he showed that the federal government’s use of a provide chain finance scheme for NHS pharmacies was once a part of Mr Greensill’s paintings.

Citigroup, who up to now hired Mr Grensill, turned into the preliminary financier of that scheme.

And in July 2018, Greensill took over pharmacies scheme, even supposing Mr Greensill had left his authorities position via then.

A month later, in August 2018, Mr Cameron joined Greensill as a part-time senior adviser.

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Cameron to Sunak: Who is who in Greensill controversy

In his personal proof to the Treasury committee previous this week, Mr Greensill denied his earlier authorities position allowed him to win contracts for his trade.

The Australian financer additionally denied claims he was once a “fraudster” and that his trade fashion was once like a “Ponzi scheme”.

However, all through his proof, he did element how Mr Cameron had attended Greensill board conferences since becoming a member of the company, and the way he and Mr Cameron had travelled in combination at the corporate’s personal jets.

Mr Cameron has up to now showed he and Mr Greensill had met with Saudia Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, at a time when the Saudi ruler was once going through world condemnation over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

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